We make steps easy. Call us today - (877) 257-0456

Tag Archives: accessibility

Autumn Senior Safety Tips – Part #1

Senior Safety Tips: Social worker is visiting a senior woman at home

Contrary to some beliefs, America’s seniors are a diverse group. But no matter where they live, how they worship or who they vote for, America’s senior citizens tend to have one thing in common: they like the idea of aging in place. The senior safety tips below will help make that possible.

In other words, they want to remain in their home as they get older. Continue reading "Autumn Senior Safety Tips – Part #1"

Making Your Home Accessible for the Holidays

Home for the holidayThere’s a lot of work that goes into getting your home ready for holiday guests: cooking, cleaning, adding fresh sheets to the guest room.

But when one of your guests has a disability, your job is to make your home not just hospitable, but accessible. If this is new territory for you, don’t worry. We’ve put together a few tips to help guests who have disabilities feel more at home.

Continue reading "Making Your Home Accessible for the Holidays"

Mobility Tips for Aging in Place

aging in placeFor a growing number of aging Americans who are no longer quite as capable as they once were of getting around without assistance, or of completing everyday activities without help, the idea of moving into a senior care facility simply doesn’t sound appealing.

Instead, they would rather remain in the homes in which they’ve spent their adult lives. Homes that are familiar, and where they feel comfortable and safe. Homes, in many instances, with mortgages that have long ago been paid off.

So many older Americans, in fact, have begun choosing to remain in their homes regardless of their ability to adequately look after themselves that a phrase has been coined for the trend. It’s known as “aging in place.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), aging in place is nothing more than “the ability to live in one’s own home and community safely, independently, and comfortably, regardless of age, income, or ability level.”

A senior who chooses to age in place, in other words, is a person who hasn’t yet given up on life. This is a person, you might say, who is confident that he or she can overcome any obstacles that may appear during the quest to continue living a happily fulfilled and well-rounded life.

If that sounds like you, or like someone you love, we have good news: There are any number of simple and affordable home modifications that can make any house a safer and more welcoming place for people with mobility issues, vision problems, or nearly any other impediment that tends to be common in old age.

Here are just a few ideas for transforming a non-accessible home into a place where you or your aging relatives can age in place without constant fear of injury.

Continue reading "Mobility Tips for Aging in Place"

Our Guide to Wheelchair Accessible Amusement Parks

wheelchair accessible parks stair lifts philadelphia
Morgan’s Wonderland in San Antonio, Tex.

It’s tough to say exactly how many wheelchair users there are in the United States. Some statistics claim there are nearly 3 million regular users of wheelchairs in the country, while a recent report published by the Disability Statistics Center of the University of California suggests the number is closer to 1.7 million. But no matter how you slice it, one thing’s for sure: That’s a whole lot of people.

If you spend the majority of your day—or your entire day—in a wheelchair, you know full well just how frustrating it can be to get from point A to point B. According to the aforementioned University of California report, for instance, “four-fifths of wheelchair users report that their local public transportation system is difficult to use or to get to.” And “two-thirds of mobility device users have limitations in one or more of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL).” So the fact that most leisure activities aren’t designed to be easy for people with disabilities shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to any of us.

However, there is a good news for wheelchair-bound leisure seekers, both here in the United States and abroad. As accessibility issues are becoming more and more mainstream—and in some circles, more expected—theme parks, amusement parks, and other vacation spots that have traditionally been off-limits to those in wheelchairs are beginning to change their ways.

If you’re looking for a bit of traditional theme park fun but aren’t able to leave your chair, the following guide is a good place to start searching for opportunities.

Continue reading "Our Guide to Wheelchair Accessible Amusement Parks"